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Home > Newsletters > October 2003

Recent Research

 

Treatments for Hot Flashes

    Adverse Reactions to Acupuncture
 

Auricular Acupuncture Effective in Treating Postoperative Nausea


Treatments for Hot Flashes

Eighty-five percent of menopausal women in western countries experience hot flashes. With the increased knowledge of side effects attributable to conventional treatment options, more women are exploring natural alternatives. Although more definitive research is necessary, several natural therapies show promise in treating hot flashes without the risks associated with conventional therapies. Soy and other phytoestrogens, black cohosh, evening primrose oil, vitamin E, the bioflavonoid hesperidin with vitamin C, ferulic acid, acupuncture treatment, and regular aerobic exercise have been shown effective in treating hot flashes in menopausal women.

Philp, H.A. Hot flashes a review of the literature on alternative and complementary treatment approaches. Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic 8(3):284-302.


Adverse Reactions to Acupuncture

The authors reviewed the potentially serious adverse events associated with acupuncture as reported in retrospective reviews, case reports, and prospective surveys of practitioners. They found that both the general public and physicians are becoming more interested in the ancient Chinese medical practice of acupuncture. This paper discusses the basic philosophy of acupuncture and describes adverse events that might be associated with acupuncture treatment. Some events, such as nausea and syncope, can be mild and transient, but rare events, such as septicemia and hepatitis C infection, can be fatal. As the role of acupuncture in today's multidisciplinary clinics increases, the complications of acupuncture, although infrequent, cannot be overlooked. They conclude that responsible clinicians must be aware of any complications that can arise from using acupuncture.

Chung, A. et al. Adverse effects of acupuncture. Which are clinically significant? Canadian Family Physician 49:985-9.


Auricular Acupuncture Effective in Treating Postoperative Nausea

The authors studied the effect of auricular acupuncture on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). One hundred female patients undergoing transabdominal hysterectomy participated in the study. The patients were divided into two groups (auricular acupuncture treatment group and non-treatment group) in order to test the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture. There was no significant difference in age, weight, height or duration of anesthesia between the two groups of patients. The authors found a significant difference between the control and auricular acupuncture treatment groups in the incidence of vomiting 12 hours after surgery (68% and 30%, respectively, p < 0.01). They did not observe any noteworthy side effects from treatment. The researchers conclude that auricular acupuncture is effective in reducing vomiting following transabdominal hysterectomy in female patients.

Kim, Y. et al. Clinical observations on postoperative vomiting treated by auricular acupuncture. The American Journal of Chinese Medicine.

This Month's Articles

October 2003
Volume 1, Number 8

Preventing Breast Cancer

Philippine Church Turns to Traditional Cures

Acupuncture Students Receive Complementary Health Scholarships

Recent Research

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