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Home > Newsletters > May 2008 > Recent Research

Points - Recent Research

Chinese Herbal Medicine for Primary Dysmenorrhea

Effect of Earlobe-Bleeding Plus Body Acupuncture in 85 cases of Common Acne

Forty Cases of Gastrointestinal Neurosis Treated by Acupuncture


Chinese Herbal Medicine for Primary Dysmenorrhea

Zhu X, Proctor M, Bensoussan A, Wu E, Smith C.

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine may be a suitable alternative. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (to 2006), MEDLINE (1950 to January 2007), EMBASE (1980 to January 2007), CINAHL (1982 to January 2007), AMED (1985 to January 2007), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library issue 4, 2006), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1990 to January 2007), Traditional Chinese Medicine Database System (TCMDS, 1990 to December 2006), and the Chinese BioMedicine Database (CBM, 1990 to December 2006) were searched. Citation lists of included trials were also reviewed. SELECTION CRITERIA: Any randomised controlled trials involving Chinese herbal medicine versus placebo, no treatment, conventional therapy, heat compression, another type of Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture or massage. Exclusion criteria were identifiable pelvic pathology and dysmenorrhoea resulting from the use of an intra-uterine contraceptive device. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality assessment, data extraction and data translation were performed independently by two review authors. Attempts were made to contact study authors for additional information and data. Data were combined for meta-analysis using either Peto odds ratios or relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data or weighted mean difference for continuous data. A fixed-effect statistical model was used, where suitable. If data were not suitable for meta-analysis, any available data from the trial were extracted and presented as descriptive data. MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-nine randomised controlled trials involving a total of 3475 women were included in the review. A number of the trials were of small sample size and poor methodological quality. Results for Chinese herbal medicine compared to placebo were unclear as data could not be combined (3 RCTs). Chinese herbal medicine resulted in significant improvements in pain relief (14 RCTs; RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.52 to 2.60), overall symptoms (6 RCTs; RR 2.17, 95% CI 1.73 to 2.73) and use of additional medication (2 RCTs; RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.93) when compared to use of pharmaceutical drugs. Self-designed Chinese herbal formulae resulted in significant improvements in pain relief (18 RCTs; RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.36), overall symptoms (14 RCTs; RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.40) and use of additional medication (5 RCTs; RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34 to 1.87) after up to three months of follow-up when compared to commonly used Chinese herbal health products. Chinese herbal medicine also resulted in better pain relief than acupuncture (2 RCTs; RR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82) and heat compression (1 RCT; RR 2.08, 95% CI 2.06 to 499.18). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The review found promising evidence supporting the use of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea; however, results are limited by the poor methodological quality of the included trials.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008 Apr 16;(2):CD005288.

Source PubMed

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Effect of Earlobe-Bleeding Plus Body Acupuncture in 85 cases of Common Acne

Liu Z. Acupuncture Institute, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China.

OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical effect of earlobe-bleeding plus body acupuncture for common acne. METHODS: The earlobe-bleeding plus local and body acupuncture based on syndrome differentiation was adopted for 85 cases of common acne. RESULTS: Of the 85 cases treated, 61 were cured, 12 markedly effective, 9 improved, and 3 failed. The total effective rate was 96.47%. CONCLUSIONS: The therapy can treat both the Biao-symptom and Ben-root of common acne, short in course and effective in result.

J Tradit Chin Med. 2008 Mar;28(1):18-20.

Source: PubMed

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Forty Cases of Gastrointestinal Neurosis Treated by Acupuncture

Zhao Y, et al. Hebei Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050011, China.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for gastrointestinal neurosis with that of oral remedy. METHODS: Eighty cases were randomly divided into the following 2 groups. In the treatment group, acupuncture was given for one month at the main points of Zhongwan (CV 12), Zusanli (ST 36), Taichong (LR 3) and Shenmen (HT 7), with the auxiliary points selected according to TCM differentiation. In the control group, Domperidone was orally administered for one month. RESULTS: The total effective rate was 92.5% in the treatment group and 75.0% in the control group, with a significant difference between the 2 groups (chi2 = 4.423, P < 0.05). Acupuncture was superior to the oral remedy in therapeutic effects. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture may show better results for gastrointestinal neurosis and with less toxic side effects.

J Tradit Chin Med. 2008 Mar;28(1):15-7.

Source: PubMed

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