Points - Recent Research
The Effects of Active Acupuncture and Placebo Acupuncture on Insomnia Patients
Efficacy of Acupuncture for Urinary Incontinence in Middle-Aged and Elderly Women
Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Pain, Function, and Biochemical Inflammation After Total Knee Arthroplasty

The Effects of Active Acupuncture and Placebo Acupuncture on Insomnia Patients

Leixiao Zhang, et al

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to observe and compare the clinical efficacy of active acupuncture and placebo acupuncture in the treatment of insomnia and mood disorders. 96 patients with insomnia in Chengdu were randomly divided into two groups (1:1). The active acupuncture group (AA group n = 48) received the tube of Park sham device with deep needle insertion. The placebo acupuncture group (PA group n = 48) received the tube of Park sham device with a retractable needle shaft and a blunt tip. The same acupuncture points and treatment cycles were used in both groups. The overall score for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes recorded sleep rate, self-reported depression scale (SDS), self-assessment anxiety scale (SAS), the 'six component' scores of PSQI, and 'Deqi' scale scores. Eventually, 90 patients completed the study. After 2 weeks of treatment, the total score of PSQI in the AA group was 4.6 ± 2.4 and in the PA group was 12.9 ± 1.8 (ES = 3.91, p < .1). The SAS, SDS score in the AA group were 39.9 ± 5.6/39.9 ± 5.9 and in the PA group were 59.7 ± 6.1/61.2 ± 4.4 (ES = 3.38/4.9, p < .1). The sleep rate were 93.8% and 25.0% (p < .1). During the 1 month follow-up period, the PSQI total score in the AA group (5.2 ± 1.9) was superior to the PA group (13.1 ± 1.8) (ES = 4.27, p < .1). The SAS, SDS score in the AA group were 40.4 ± 5.1/42.7 ± 6.6 and in the PA group were 63.7 ± 6.6/63.5 ± 4.8 (ES = 3.95/3.60, p < .1). Throughout the study period, the 'six component' scores of PSQI in the AA group was superior to the PA group (each p < .1). Except for tingling and cooling, other acupuncture sensations were significant differences (each p < .1). Compared to the placebo acupuncture, active acupuncture can significantly improve insomnia, and clinical efficacy is maintained for at least 6 weeks.

Psychol Health Med. 2020 Dec;25(10):1201-1215. doi: 10.1080/13548506.2020.1738015. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Source: PubMed

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Efficacy of Acupuncture for Urinary Incontinence in Middle-Aged and Elderly Women

Na Yang, et al.

Abstract
Objectives: Our aim was to generalize the available evidence and evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture for urinary incontinence in middle-aged and elderly women.
Methods: Six databases including VIP, CNKI, Wan Fang, Web of Science, PubMed and The Cochrane Library were systematically searched to retrieve similar studies updated to December 2019 to gather RCTs regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for middle-aged and elderly women with urinary incontinence. Two researchers independently performed the whole process of retrieving the studies, extracting the data and assessing the risk of bias of the included studies. The current meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software.
Results: A total of eight studies with 607 patients were included in the evaluation. The current meta-analysis showed that Compared with rehabilitation exercise or medication, acupuncture intervention significantly improved the clinical effectiveness (OR = 5.52, 95 % CI, 3.13-9.73), reduced the urine leakage in pad test (SMD = -2.67, 95 % CI, -4.05 to -1.29) and decrease the ICIQ-SF score (MD = -3.46, 95 % CI, -3.69 to -3.22). The results indicated that acupuncture intervention can help the patients alleviate the symptoms effectively.
Conclusion: Based on this study, acupuncture intervention of stress urinary incontinence in middle-aged and elderly women can improve the clinical effectiveness, reduce the urine leakage in pad test and ICIQ-SF score. More high-quality studies with large sample size are required for further verification.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2021 Feb;257:138-143.

Source: PubMed

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Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Pain, Function, and Biochemical Inflammation After Total Knee Arthroplasty

BeomRyong Kim, et al.

Abstract
Context: Clinical studies suggest that AL-TENS, acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), is effective for treating many types of pain and physical dysfunction. To date, only a few studies have compared the TENS and AL-TENS forms of stimulation, and no studies have compared the efficacy of conventional TENS and AL-TENS in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA).
Objectives: The study intended to determine (1) the efficacy of conventional TENS and AL-TENS for TKA patients and (2) which outcomes-pain at rest, movement-evoked pain, and physical function-were most likely to be affected by conventional TENS compared with AL-TENS for people with pain, to inform the design of future studies.
Design: The research team designed a single-blind, randomized clinical trial with randomized treatment allocation.
Setting: The study took place at the Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital of Jeonju (Jeonju, South Korea).
Participants: Participants were 30 patients at the hospital who had undergone TKA.
Intervention: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, TENS or AL-TENS, and received the relevant intervention at selected points for knee pain. Each group received treatment for 30 min per visit, 5 times per wk, for 2 wk during the study.
Outcome measures: Outcome measures were pain intensity, measured with a visual analogue scale; knee functional mobility, measured with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and with the Timed Up & Go Test; and inflammation, measured by the C-reactive protein level. Data were collected at baseline and postintervention.
Results: Changes in pain, knee function, knee mobility, and inflammation between baseline and postintervention were statistically significant for both groups (P < .05). Changes in pain, stiffness, and inflammation between baseline and postintervention were significantly greater for the AL-TENS group compared with TENS group (P < .05).
Conclusions: AL-TENS was more effective than TENS with respect to pain, stiffness, and inflammation relief for patients following TKA.

Altern Ther Health Med. 2021 Jan;27(1):28-34.

Source: PubMed

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